Europe 1945 & 2017

What These Stories Are About

When my partner of 62 years died in 2013, I lost a huge part of myself. Her spirit had made its way into mine and become a major source of support for my being. Then, all of a sudden, a huge part of it was gone. All I had left was my awareness of her location and that I could still communicate with her. In her last few years I found myself writing memoirs as I was tending to her declining health. It was the only course of internally satisfying action I could take under those conditions.

It was a blessing. It provided a way to perceive life from our past and observe all the goods and bads therein. An ability that you will recognize more fully if you read any of my stories. In fact, I have written a story entitled “Dienstglas” that describes that idea fairly well – it follows. My method of writing had now become changed. I am writing to her spirit now, which I know is in a place where I will soon be, if I conduct myself in an approvable way.

It is my aim to do so. But to do it, I must be sure all the loose ends are secured and what I have done wrong, make the effort to do right. Memoirs are great mirrors. They allow one to see reflections that can reveal things needing repair. That is true, if one looks at the whole picture, not just what one wishes to see. There’s bad stuff there, too. The good news is that it can be fixed. Fixed in spirit that is. Saying you’re sorry, in other words. Going back in spirit and restoring broken relationships and bad deeds.

My life is full of bad deeds and broken relationships. Is yours? It doesn’t matter. What matters is we have ways to spiritually repair those in need. Those who have those needs have a vehicle in which to travel back and do whatever fixing is required.

My daughter Patty and I have put in place a website specifically designed to do what I have been describing. It is: Relighting Us (relighting.us)

It is available at no charge, to place stories that deal in those kinds of messages. Please check it out and start to contribute your own stories. Our stories are what we are all about. At the very least, you will meet many thoughtful people who seek to improve their spiritual health.

All my stories are either found directly or indirectly in what I have titled: “Conversations with Jean.” They are my way of keeping in touch with her spirit. Those indirectly, are found under separate titles, but are automatically dedicated to being part of my conversations with her. She is still spiritually within me and I enjoy talking to her.
Just like the old days…

Most of my other stories are from those places where I have been supported. Their overall theme is about separation and reconciliation. Put another way, it is about the losing and finding of love. It’s what we’re all about. They are one human being’s journey. A journey where he was able to exercise control over the gifts he was given, and about the graces he requested.

When Jean left, I sought and found other support. My children, my friends, and another life I lived during a very important historical time – World War II. A time of great trial and accomplishment all at the same time. A time when we, as a nation, needed all the support we could get. The support of its people in the overcoming of an unspeakable evil that threatened to overtake the world.
My role in that crucial time was as Private in the Army of the United States. Specifically, Private First Class, A Company, 59th Armored Infantry Battalion, 13th Armored Division. I never appreciated how important that support was until my mainstay of support left me. It’s a long story, and dealt with elsewhere in my 13th Armored Division stories, but indeed a life saver for me when Jean died.
A lot of my stories are about those days. Days that shaped me more than I ever knew. Stories that when added to my memories of my 62 years of marriage show an amazing series of graces that are still happening to this very day. Graces, that like my marriage, were gifts of experiences that allowed me to see more clearly what our journey here is all about.

Succinctly put, the importance of Fatherhood and Brotherhood. How vital to each of us they are. How separation and reparation continually swirl about us, and how we can help each other to deal with them in a satisfying manner. War Veterans have a special bond. They have participated in sacrifice. Their messages are wisdom for the ages. Wisdom to be passed on and shared in ways that lead to peace.

I had a partner in all of this storytelling. His stories and contributions are involved as well. He is Steve McAlpin. An Army Combat Veteran of 27 years of service in Afghanistan and Bosnia. Steve served as a Major in his final days. He is the other lens in the Dienstglas story following. He is the view that sees close-up details with an Officer’s eyes of clarity and focus. Our differences in view were mutually supportive, as we both returned to our pasts and together did what we could to right what was wrong. Those stories are our contribution to that process. Everyone has a role to play in doing that same process. All those who take the trouble to read these stories have that opportunity.

Do your part.
You will be better for it…


FIRST EDITION – Europe 1945 & 2017

  1. An Amazing Grace
  2. Lost and Found
  3. Brothers Reunited
  4. Dienstglas
  5. Braunau

Support

These stories could not come about without one key ingredient – support…

Life is too much of a load for one person. We all need help. We each need each other. The more the merrier. At the beginning of this narrative, I told of losing a huge part of myself. That part was my main support for 62 years. It had a purpose. It kept me balanced. Everything came together. I was whole.

Able to see what was to be seen with different sets of eyes. To take into account other views and to make sense of what was seen. From there to better find all that could seen and adjust to it. Jean’s lenses were different than mine. She could see what I couldn’t and vice versa. No one person can take on all that is out there. We need help. Seeing what is behind is especially difficult. Veteran’s express that at “Having your back.” Looking out for each other, is another way to express it.

My partner in these stories is Steve McAlpin. He is an extraordinary person. His outlook is very close up and caring. He has a huge sense of duty. He is organized and disciplined. I, on the other hand, lack those very skills of character. I tend to contemplate the forest, but can’t seem to see the trees. We are like a pair of binoculars. Look in one end, see up close. Look in the other, see far away.

Both views are important. They support each other as we seek to navigate this huge information puzzle into which we have been placed. The more views we are able to see the better we are able to see what needs to be seen.

Seen in ways where we all can come together as family and live in peace with each other.